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20120916
20120916
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
take. the images of the american embassy burning in benghazi might have conjured up memories of tehran in 1979,but the analogy is false. in libya, the government is not fomenting anti-americanism. it's lamb meanting it. the violence there appears to have been the work of small extremist elements that lack much popular support. but the storm has spread from libya. across the middle east there have been protests rallying against the united states and the west in general. even in these places, however, keep in mind that these crowds number in the hundreds, perhaps thousands. in countries with tens of millions of people. they make for vivid images be u they don't tell the whole story. what can we say about these places and protests? first in many of these countries, particularly those that have toppled dictatorships, the most important reality is not of bad government but of weak government. in libya, yemen, and even egypt, the state has lost its ability to control its public. in a sense, this might be progress. egypt didn't see protests like this before because mubarak's regime would arre
that's erupting. starting with kcairo. benghazi and now, beyond. you wrote an op-ed "the new york times" about all of this saying the republicans are in disarray, they're divided about national security and foreign policy. so, did mr. romney's handling, his comments following the unrest in egypt further kind of underscore a real girth of understanding if not confusion? >> yeah, it's a little bit of both and i think if you see mitt romney hours after our top diplomat and three other americans were murdered in libya, he was trying to use this as a political case and then the reaction to romney within his own party. many republicans shaking their heads and criticizing and saying this is not the moment. some even noting that when reagan and george h.w. bush ran for president in 1980 and we had servicemen killed trying to rescue hostages in iran, reagan didn't politicize that moment, neither did bush, so it seems that the republican party has lost its way. there are so many splits inside of the party about spending and how do we predict power in the world that many republicans really don't k
the streets of benghazi myself, and despite what we saw in that horrific incident where some mob was hijacked ultimately by a handful of extremists, the united states is extremely popular in libya and the outpouring of sympathy and support for ambassador stevens and his colleagues from the government and from people as evidence of that, the fact is, candy, that this is a turbulent time. it's a time of dramatic change. it's a change that the united states has backed because we understand that when democracy takes root, when human rights and people's freedom of expression can be manifested, it may lead to turbulence in the short-term, but over the long-term, that is in the interest of the united states. the mobs we've seen on the outside of these embassies are small minority. they're the ones who have largely lost in these emerging democratic processes, and just as the people of these countries are not going to allow their lives to be hijacked by a dictator, they're not going to allow an extremist mob to hijack their future and their freedom, and we're going to continue to stand with the vast m
, militants attacked the u.s. consul in benghazi and killed the ambassador and three american men close to him. >>> want to talk to general wesley clarke, general, thank you for joining us. can u.s. forces help keep these consulates and embassies safer? >> certainly they can. first of all, forces around the consulates can provide direct defense. they can also provide deterrents and simply the word that we're putting additional forces in there has to be heard by people. the forces offshore can provide reinforcements, provide additional intelligence and a lot going on behind the scenes, you can be sure of that. our intelligence agencies, our pounding the beat, looking for the source of the attacks, during the after action review as to what happened and why. looking to find ways to prevent and get early warning of future attacks there, is a lot going on that we're not seeing. >> general, some of these countries like yemen and sudan say they don't want u.s. troops sent there. hodo military leaders handle that? can the pentagon send troops to nonhostile places where they aren't wanted? >> well, i t
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

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